Quick and Dirty Network Latency Graph in Powershell

I was on a project recently where I was unable to access (and therefore monitor) any of the networking equipment and the WAN links thereof. Noticing that the issues that were occurring were due to a network problem I spoke with the folks who ran that particular network — they were no help. They gave me as little information as possible and punted the issue back to me saying it was a server problem. So here I am, no access to the network equipment, can’t monitor or log the WAN links, workstation in branch office having intermittent issues reaching the server in the main office. Enter powershell:-

#—–Start—–
do {

#Ping google.com and select only the response time then output to file
test-connection google.com | Select-Object -Property ResponseTime >> pingoutput.csv

#Sleep for 10 seconds
Start-Sleep -s 10

#Write the time to the file
get-date >> pingoutput.csv

#Set the Time variable for the end while condition
$Time = (Get-Date).Hour

}

#While loop end condition states continue only if time is less than 5pm (24 hour clock)
while ($Time -le 17)
#—–End—–

The comments in the script state how it works and what each line does. After 5pm (the while loop end condition) you can grab that output .csv file and pull it in to excel. Once there you select your data real quick and you’ve got yourself a nice little graph of network latency in milliseconds over the period of the day.

network

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